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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
. hurricane sandy brings the city that never sleeps to its knees, leaving millions without power. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. wall street is working on a comeback with plans to reopen stock trading tomorrow, despite heavy flooding in lower manhattan. >> susie: from crippled transportation throughout the northeast to canceled flights, the federal response and potential election impact. we'll have all that and more right here on nbr! >> tom: hurricane sandy is now super-storm sandy as it clashes with another weather system, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the stor
in the program. with 50 million people in her path, hurricane sandy makes her full presence felt in the northeast. the slow moving storm has wall street closed for business, cancelled thousands of flights and shut down countless businesses. sandy's reach stretches hundreds of miles. we will talk about its potential impact on everything from economic growth to energy prices. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! as we go on the air tonight, hurricane sandy is ready to make landfall in the u.s., already it's an historic storm, with historic prparations. stock marketclosed. and coast lines evacuated with tens of millions of people sitting in the forecast path of the massive storm. sandy is a huge storm expected to come ashore in southern new jersey. but the hurricane force winds have been battering the eastern seaboard for hours. those winds extend out 175 miles from the center of the storm. those winds are pushing the atlantic ocean up and over many coast-lines. from rhode island, south to the jersey shore. coastal flooding is a significant risk thanks to the storm surge, potentially reaching 11 feet
the election. u.s. businesses added 171,000 jobs in october across many industries. four days after sandy, the gas crunch in jersey, access to cash in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the k message tre is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the lon
evening i'm susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> tom: wall street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus, what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surprise, home depot was the dow's standout. >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the
report on jobless claims and the confidence survey were collected before hurricane sandy. meanwhile, the effects of the monster storm are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: fr and a ha mlion pple are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by includi
up. >> susie: businesses and homeowners are bracing for hurricane sandy, as the storm heads for the northeast. it's being called "franken- storm," and with heavy rains expected, it's on track to be one of the costliest storms in history. sandy has soaked florida's east coast, and is expected in the new jersey, new york area by monday. in the path of the storm: several of the nation's biggest cities, travel hubs and several major gasoline refineries along the new jersey and delaware coasts. financial centers like the nasdaq and new york stock exchange, say they'll have contingency plans in place. electronic trading is expected to continue as normal. michael barry says insurance companies are already mobilizing to deal with damage from hurricane sandy. he's vice president, with the insurance information institute. >> what are insurance companies doing to be prepared? >> well, right now they're trying to figure out exactly where this storm is going to make landfall. as indicated they have mobile catastrophe units sent to the scene so that the insurers can go out and cater to th
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)